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Northern Pantanal

Accessed via the town of Cuiaba, the northern Pantanal is home to some of Brazil’s rarest wildlife, such as jaguar and giant river otter. Many of the lodges here are still functioning cattle ranches, offering day and night trips by boat, vehicle, on foot and on horseback, accompanied by local naturalist guides.

  • Destination: Brazil

The Amazon

The basin of the world’s largest river contains its oldest tropical forest and most diverse ecosystem, with at least 40,000 plant species, and a variety of wildlife. The lodges offer outings on foot and by canoe to explore the rainforest. Alternatively a riverboat voyage can take you deeper into the rainforest.

  • Destination: Brazil

Southern Pantanal

Conservation projects in the southern Pantanal focus on jaguar and the hyacinth macaw. From a comfortable lodge you can see wildlife by boat, vehicle and on foot. Bonito, on the southern fringe, is a mecca for ecotourism, where you will find grottos with blue lakes and walking trails surrounded by monkeys.

  • Destination: Brazil

The Pantanal

This ecological paradise is the world’s largest wetland, with 124 mammals (including the world’s largest jaguars), 177 reptiles, 1,100 species of butterfly, and a myriad of birds, brightly coloured flowers, and shoals of fish. There are significant differences between the north and south; we recommend visiting both.

  • Destination: Brazil

Iwokrama Rainforest

Named after the 1,000-metre-high Iwokrama Mountains that lie at its heart, this area of dense rainforest covers some 3,710 square kilometres of central Guyana, and is one of the world’s four remaining pristine tropical forests – along with those in the Congo, New Guinea, and Amazonia.

  • Destination: Guyana

Rewa

The remote Amerindian community of Rewa is located in the north Rupununi , at the confluence of the Rewa and Rupununi rivers. The village has a population of around 300 inhabitants, mostly made up of people from the indigenous Makushi tribe, along with a few Wapixani and Patamona families.

  • Destination: Guyana

Manu National Park

The unique diversity of Manu’s wildlife is due to the range of ecological zones that extend from 300 to 4,000 metres above sea level. More than 1,000 species of birds, 200 species of mammals, many reptiles, and around 10% of the world’s plant species have been recorded within the park's boundaries.

  • Destination: Peru